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Transport for London (TfL) launch Vision Zero Week
Transport for London (TfL) launch Vision Zero Week

Transport for London (TfL) launch Vision Zero Week

Transport for London (TfL) has launched Vision Zero Week to highlight the success in the year since the start of the Action Plan, but to also call for more improvements in road safety.

Running from 22 – 28 July, Vision Zero Week has revealed that the number of people killed on London’s roads in 2018 fell to the lowest level on record.

This saw the number of deaths decrease from 131 in 2017 to 111 last year.

Whilst TfL has welcomed this decrease, Vision Zero Week will reveal the impact road deaths have on the family of victims, therefore highlighting that even one death or serious injury is too many.

The campaign – ‘Know My Name’ – shares the stories of five victims to show the terrible impact road collisions have on people’s lives.

TfL has always been clear that the culture that deaths and serious injuries are inevitable cannot and should not be accepted – something that Lilli Matson, spoke about in an interview with Transport Britain.

As a result, TfL and the Metropolitan Police are working to eliminate death and serious injury on the capital’s transport network by 2041.

Stuart Reid is the Director of Vision Zero for TfL. He said: “Reducing the number of people dying or being seriously injured on our transport network to zero by 2041 is an ambitious target.

“However, when you think about the people who make up these numbers – someone’s father, daughter, sister, husband or child – how can we strive to achieve anything other than zero?

“Too many lives and communities in London are blighted by road trauma. We must see this for the issue it is and do everything we can to prevent this devastation from happening.

“So much work has gone into Vision Zero already this year, but we all have so much more to do and we won’t stop until we achieve Vision Zero.”

Since the launch of the Action Plan, much has been achieved, such as the transformation of London’s most dangerous junctions; introduction of a new standard to remove the most dangerous HGVs from London’s roads; protected cycle routes; and lower speed limits.

However, the fact that deaths have been recorded, and the incidences of serious injury have also increased, it confirms that more needs to be done.

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