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Morgan Sindall chosen by TfL to replace Blackhorse Lane and Addiscombe Park bridges
Morgan Sindall chosen by TfL to replace Blackhorse Lane and Addiscombe Park bridges

Morgan Sindall chosen by TfL to replace Blackhorse Lane and Addiscombe Park bridges

Morgan Sindall has been appointed by Transport for London (TfL) to replace Blackhorse Lane Bridge and Addiscombe Park Bridge.

Continuing an ongoing and hugely successful partnership, TfL chose Morgan Sindall to replace the projects in a joint project, which will result in cost and time savings for both TfL and London Borough Council.

Blackhorse Lane Bridge is a 120-year-old structure and renewing it is necessary in order to provide a bridge that is fit for the future.

During the project which will start this summer, a bridge deck will be removed and replaced.

This particular bridge used to be owned by Network Rail but was transferred to TfL five years ago. The latter’s structural surveys have deduced that its three-tonne weight limit needs to be reduced further.

Although traffic weight restriction measures have previously been put in place, they have been deemed ineffective, so Blackhorse Lane Bridge will be closed to traffic while it is replaced.

Addiscombe Park Bridge will be made two metres wider so that a cycle path can be incorporated, improving facilities for local people as well as cyclists.

Throughout the majority of work, London Trams will operate. However, closures may be needed for short periods during construction to ensure health and safety.

Roy O’Neill, General Manager for London Trams, explained why work on the two bridges is required.

He said: “The appointment of Morgan Sindall as the preferred contractor is an important step in replacing this 120-year-old bridge which is reaching the end of its natural life.

“Working closely with the London Borough of Croydon has meant that we can replace both Blackhorse Lane and Addiscombe Park bridges as a joint project, helping us construct them both quicker and more cheaply.

“We look forward to both bridges being open to the public in January 2019.”

The main construction works are expected to take six months to complete, which will be preceded by a detailed design period, site investigations, utility diverting and enabling works.

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